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Knife in hand

VIDEO: Knife Versus Gun: It’s Not Always So Clear

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Recently, we covered UF Pro’s video experimenting with various handgun disarms. It showed some very interesting stuff!

This time, the UF Pro team analyzed knife attacks at different ranges and under different conditions — it’s informative stuff, and it’s worth a watch (if you’re feeling lazy you can just look at the breakdown below):

Knife vs. Handgun – A Reality Check

The ultimate question: what distance should you keep when dealing with an attacker armed with a knife? We tested this with two spec ops veterans, a REX firearms Zero 1 FX handgun and a dummy knife. See the results for yourself. Sign up for more content like this: https://goo.gl/jGqsXs

Posted by UF PRO on Friday, July 27, 2018

The first attack takes place at three feet, where the defender with a firearm is at an extreme disadvantage. The defender isn’t even allowed to move. As you might imagine, the gunman wasn’t able to unholster and shoot in time to mitigate the attack.

In fact, it wasn’t even close.

In the second scenario, the defender was still at very close range. He was able to back up to try to buy some time.

It wasn’t enough time.

After these two little self-defense disasters, the two were separated to a greater distance — 10 feet. Again, the first time the defender didn’t have the chance to back off the attacker.

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Again, it went terribly.

But hark! What happened when the defender was allowed to back off of his attacker?

Well, darned if creating distance with a ranged weapon didn’t give the gun-wielder an advantage. The attack was successfully evaded!

Back it up to 21 feet, and things start to get interesting.

Most of the time, the defender was able to subdue the attacker before he made contact, but not each time. The difference seems to boil down to a solid gun draw.

Practice your holstering and unholstering, folks.

There are a couple of things to note, here, in addition to what the video covers:

  1. The firearm here was being fired in double action mode. Although it’s not everyone’s favorite mode of carry, it’s worth mentioning that those of us who carry cocked and locked, half-cocked and locked, or anything else that’ll keep you from an immediate shot will affect your draw time, which brings us to #2:
  2. Carrying without a round in the chamber will leave you royally screwed when success is measured in tenths of seconds.

I’m not judging anyone. I’m just urging you — carry like you might need your firearm in a very finite amount of time.

Be safe out there, folks.

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Categories: Beginners Guide, General
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About John Falkenberg | View all posts by John Falkenberg

Falkenberg is a veteran writer and active voice in the gun community. He is passionate about not only ensuring that American citizens know their rights, but why they have those…

Falkenberg is a veteran writer and active voice in the gun community. He is passionate about not only ensuring that American citizens know their rights, but why they have those rights and what a gift it is to be in a country that acknowledges their God-given freedoms. His standard concealed carry rig is a Tristar T-100 in 9mm settled comfortably in a Quick Click and Carry Holster made by JM4 Tactical.

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