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Pistol readiness

3 Fun Hobbies That Improve Concealed Carry

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Video Games – Really?  Yes.

Visual acuity.  It’s underplayed.  The ability to see a thing and respond to it is vital.  It’s not necessary to play violent video games to develop this.  It’s simply important to play video games that involve your ability to track an object and respond.

Just the simple act of playing video games can help sharpen your ability to detect objects and respond to them at distance.

Playing Musical Instruments

Manual dexterity is one of the things that let’s our brain know it’s time to go on target.  These skills are developed through practice.  And firearms aren’t the only way to do that!  Playing guitar or other instruments that require a high level of finger movement are all fantastic for developing those skill sets.

Muscle memory is the key to being a great concealed carrier.  Why not improve both your ability to employ a firearm in your own defense while also making beautiful melodies for the audience?

Disclaimer:  The above clip is intended for entertainment purposes only.  Hollywood has absolutely NOTHING to do with actual firearms training.

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Athletics – Does It Help?

This one is understated.  It’s not so much that you need to be strong in order to fire a firearm, you just need coordination.  But does it really help?

Turns out – it does.  Now maybe a couple studies and fancy gadgetry won’t prove a concept in motion – but one thing is true: the more in tune your reflexes are, the better you will perform under stress.

You don’t need to down a whole Russian cycle of steroids in order to gain those effects.  You just need to maintain a good regimen of cardiovascular activity.  Running, jogging, walking, living a happy life – these all play into having the right mentality to respond to a hostile environment.  Seems counter-intuitive?  It’s not.  Physical science has done a lot of studies on firearms, combat stress, and even PTSD.  All seem to show that the advantage goes to the person who’s physically prepared.

Do any of these substitute training at an actual range and practicing the fundamental principles of firearm safety?  Never.  Do they assist you in training unto those efforts?  Absolutely.  So, use what you do in your everyday life to make your concealed carry experience all the better.

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Categories: Firearm Safety, General
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About G. Halek | View all posts by G. Halek

GH is a Marine Corps veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and has served as a defense contractor in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. His daily concealed carry handgun…

GH is a Marine Corps veteran of Operation Iraqi Freedom and has served as a defense contractor in Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. His daily concealed carry handgun is a Glock 26 in a Lenwood Holsters Specter IWB or his Sig Sauer SP2022 in a Dara Holsters Appendix IWB holster.

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